Ambulance Part Charge to increase

Sarah Martin |

On 1 April 2013 our Ambulance Service patient part charges will increase.

Patient part charges vary across the country and an additional amount of $4.00 or $10.00 will see charges increase to either $75.00 or $84.00 (from two rates of $65.00 and $80.00 (GST inclusive)). A further increase to patient part charges is planned next year, resulting in a standard part charge for St John ambulance services of $88.00 from 1 April 2014. The last increase was 12 months ago.

The part charge applies to ambulance attendance and/or transport for medical emergencies, as well as accident related injuries that occurred more than 24 hours previously.
We are increasing our part charges as we are facing an increase in demand for our services. In the year ending 30 June 2012 the number of incidents we attended increased by over 14,000 compared to the previous year, a 4.2% increase.

Contracts with the Ministry of Health, ACC and District Health Boards fund nearly 80% of our Ambulance Service direct operating costs. The shortfall is made up from community donations, fundraising, revenue from our commercial activities, the contribution of our volunteers, as well as contributions from part charges. We are a charity and we rely on financial and voluntary support from the community to help fund all the services we provide to New Zealanders.

Nearly 5,000 St John members are involved in emergency ambulance, patient transfer services and events - nearly 63% of whom are volunteers. They care for and save the lives of thousands of New Zealanders and visitors to the country every year.

Table of patient part charges for medical emergencies
 Area Current rate  From 1 April 2013 to
31 March 2014
 Northland, Taranaki,  Manawatu,  Whanganui $65.00  $75.00
 Auckland Coromandel, Waikato (including Taumarunui), Bay of Plenty, Hawke’s Bay, Lakes, Tairawhiti, all of the South Island $80.00  $84.00

 

For more information please contact Media Relations Manager Sarah Martin 0274 834 199

Subscribe to our RSS FeedDonate today and help equip our ambulance officers with new defibrillators.St John First Aid TrainingFeel Safe with a St John Medical AlarmHave your say